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  1. #91
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
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    96
    Definitely makes it a little harder to grab and run away with, that's for sure!

  2. #92
    Site Team
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    United Kingdom Heathrowish.
    Posts
    3,304
    I admire your stamina!

  3. #93
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by Plumpcars View Post
    I admire your stamina!
    It's mostly because I don't get a whole lot done in one go. Not so much a marathon, as a gentle stroll! Keeps me busy, anyway.

  4. #94
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    96
    Some indicators happened!



    Indicator switch fitted, but not yet wired, since I forgot just how easily the outer part of the column rotates; might have to come up with some other solution for mounting the indicator switch where I want it to be. I'll burn that bridge when I get to it.



    I also managed to put last weekend, and this bank holiday Monday, to good use; extracting the wheel cylinder from the front, and temporarily reassembling everything on that corner so I could pinch my axle stand for doing the rears.

    First little job of the day, separate the drum from the hub, to make it easier to work on the hub.


    I believe the marketing phrase to use here is "* Some sequences shortened." Plenty of use of the 2-1/2 lb hammer involved shifting that.


    Drum stowed in a side-locker, along with the others. All going according to plan so far.

    Some finagling with sockets, and spanners, and a little use of the small hammer of precision adjustment managed to extract the banjo bolt feed into the brake cylinder; and a thing that looked like a valve sort of thing...



    Turns out to be just some sort of offset adaptor to go from the 1/2-20 flexible line, to the banjo bolt.



    And it has a hollow socket type of arrangement that sits over one of the studs holding the brake cylinder on.



    Anyway, moving on... bits 'fell off'. Once again taking some persuading to do so. It's almost like these parts haven't been removed in quite some time!


    The whole arrangement sits like so:


    No pictures of the rest of the day, but it was mostly slinging the hub back on and refitting the bearing lock-nuts, then hefting the wheel and spacer into place; so I could take the jack and stand out from under the front, lift the rear, and remove those wheels.

    And around rolled the bank holiday Monday, whereupon I didn't get a great deal of pictures, but there wasn't much to take a picture of; other than my frustrated tongue-stuck-out-in-concentration expression while I tried to juggle the expander and brake cylinder together on the axle, and hold them against spring pressure, while trying to rotate the bolt (it was originally a pair of studs with nuts, but I figured bolts would be easier. More fool me.) with a spare finger.

    ...Obviously, I was already short of hands enough as it was, so there are no pictures of my expression. Which is probably for the best.

    However, I did get this nice snap of the results of a few hours' progress in the morning.



    Some cleaning of the axle required!

    Then I went to re-fit the offside wheels to do the little jackstand shuffle across to the nearside and repeat the process; and broke my shovel trying to lift the outer wheel on.
    However, someone was smiling on me (for some reason. Maybe because they were laughing so hard at me hitting myself in the face with the handle of the shovel as it snapped off? ), because there turned out to be a length of beat up aluminium tube laying around that was the perfect size to hammer over the socket on the shovel.



    It's now a lightweight racing shovel.

    The other side was very much like the first, but the other way around. Also, since I had discovered that I didn't need to take the hub off to fit the expander, I didn't jack it anywhere near as high, so I should have a lot less trouble refitting the wheels. Of course, now I've said that...

  5. #95
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,606
    Your still plodding which is more than I have done in the past few months, absolutely bugger all, things just still seem to get in the way of working on the rod.

    Keep going.

  6. #96
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    96
    Update on getting the other wheels on: 5 minutes to sling the wheels on and get enough wheelnuts on that they won't fall off again. I think I'm getting better at this. Clearly helped by the lightweight racing shovel.

    I've also gotten a NOS front wheel cylinder in, from Cyprus; and two new hub seals, from Leigh.

    The already shambolic pace will slow a bit more due to the changing of the season, I'm sure. Oh, and also because work is moving to a unit across the way, which means even further to walk with tools and stuff, since the (gorgeous, fantastically old-school, albeit leaky) building currently occupied is scheduled to be demolished.

    I'll get there, though.

  7. #97
    Site Team
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    Even though small please keep them coming though. Nicely written and always interesting.

  8. #98
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    96
    Not a great deal to report, since my last post, unfortunately. Work has been causing me a lot of stress, which significantly reduces my desire to be anywhere near the damn place to work on it... ("You can't be stressed, you only work five days a week!")

    And it's not helped that we've moved to a different unit on the estate while the old one is being demolished, with the easy route (300 ft or so) blocked off by demolition-company fencing, turning it into about a third of a mile walk between toolbox and truck. (Which isn't so bad, except for when you're on your twentieth trip after forgetting something...)

    However, I've also spent the last two weeks on holiday in Canada, which has done wonders for stress reduction. ^_^ It's not exactly done wonders for my wallet, though, but I have enough bits to be getting on with while the balance recovers somewhat.

    Between my last post:

    • I took the driver's door off and started repairs of where the mirror arm was torn off.

      Still some tweaking to do to take a dip out where the spreader plate I added on the inside (so that the load where that mirror mounts to the door-skin, is spread across a bit more area.) has pulled the sheet metal in somewhat; and a little at the top of the patch-piece where the return has gotten a little misshapen. Nothing some quality time with a hammer and some implements of leverage can't fix, so long as I can find somewhere to lever from.

      I also need to de-rust/treat, and paint, the inside of the door; It's getting closer to where it should be, though.



      MIG'd by the tack-tack-tack method. There were a few blow-throughs.



      Done with stick. A few holes where I was using 1.6mm rods that are mostly flux and spite; turned out to be easier to use 2.5mm rods on the same power setting... probably because they were putting more metal down so could actually build it up a bit more.






      Not the prettiest, especially where trying to build up gaps, but it's solid now. Once again putting the age-old phrase to work: A grinder and paint, makes me the welder I ain't.


      Et wollah. Painted with primer just to stop it corroding before I can get the inside sorted, and all the bracing rebuilt. Don't want to use filler just yet, in case I need to use a bit of prying and 'fitting' to make it line up again, which would probably just cause it to crack off.

    • The Bedford got towed to a different yard, which brings it a bit closer to the workshop. Downside -- because of course there's one -- being that the yard is smaller, so it'll be buried behind more stuff.

      Got quite a bit of attention, rolling slowly around the front of the industrial estate with hazards flashing, which was nice. My brother, normally stuck on 2-wheels, was properly chuffed with himself after parking the truck in the given space considering the biggest thing he'd driven previously (only for a short duration... and off the public highway, of course, yer 'onour) was a VW Beetle.

    • I got some wire-brushing and painting (well, primer, but it counts) done around the vicinity of the rear towing hitch. I was planning on continuing that when I got back, but the snow made me reconsider. 9_9

      I also uncovered a grease nipple while wire-wheeling the towing hitch, which was nice. Furthermore, I have discovered that someone who previously owned the truck does not appear to believe in the holding power of bolts...


      Yup, welded round! There's also a few nuts that have been welded, and a few spots where the Harvey Frost gear has been welded to the chassis.



      A couple of hours of wire-brushing and painting later, and it started to look a lot better. Surprising how long these things seem to take when the wind is determined to blow through you, rather than around you. Oh, and when someone keeps cutting your extension lead powering the battery charger for the cordless tools... (I swear, if someone made a TV documentary about my workplace, nobody would believe it wasn't all made up for the cameras. )

      Another fun discovery was that the hitch appears to have perhaps gotten rather worn out at one point, and repaired


      Something tells me this truck may not have lived an easy life.

    • I've gotten a 25ft length of cupro-nickel brake pipe in, and some 1/2-20 brake pipe nuts, so I can start on making up brake pipes. My flaring tool seems just about capable of handling the pipe, though I had to do some modification to it, and it's a bit finicky about alignment.

      (I got it lent to me from a co-worker who then later disappeared. He'd never used it either; which is no surprise, because it wasn't possible to actually put the damn thing together!

      The big pointy flaring bit was screwed in backwards -- point upwards -- and there was no way to screw it into the horseshoe clamp bit the right way round; because the pointy end was too wide to fit through the bottom of the clamp, and the thread was too long to allow me to feed it in on an angle... Cue grinder, and welder. Daft.)

  9. #99
    Old enough to know better
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Norfolk
    Posts
    2,207
    Great to see this thread up and running again.....

  10. #100
    Metal-Glueing Idiot
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    96
    Not so much running as limping; but it's still progress!

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