Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 37

Thread: T time

  1. #21
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,653
    It Snowed so a bit more time on the box ensued. The guy who had this box in his car said that it used to slip when changing gear and didn't "feel right", well as I am now an "expert" I think I may have found the answer.



    The rear clutch pack that is activated in all forward gears is FUBAR'd, each pack should have a steel plate then a friction plate then another steel plate then another friction plate etc. well this lot may as well have been all steel plates for what is left of any of the friction surfaces.

    This is for a comparison.


    So this is actually good news and I believe that they all fried very quickly and most of the debris is still confined to the clutch drum as I am having to actually chisel the gear off the inside of the drum, just to get the wavy snap ring out was a saga and took over 5 minutes to do.

    I have started to clean up the other bits and there is very little in the way of crud anywhere else, I am not splitting the main valve body as I have no idea as to what is in there (no instruction or build manual around) and so it will be fingers crossed that with a new set of seals, bushes, clutch packs, filter and oil all will be well. The issue I will have is that it will be sometime before I know if I have actually put the thing back together correctly as I don't envisage that I will have the car back together for a long time going by the current speed of build

    I will also be stalled on the box rebuild as I have decided against fitting the new bushes myself as I am fairly sure that I will bugger them up if I do, not alot of finesse with a big hammer and some blunt instruments so I will find an engineering shop to do them for me, however I doubt any will be working till the new year but will give it ago tomorrow just in case.

  2. #22
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Bucks
    Posts
    3,048
    If all the friction material is gone, I will guarantee the valve body needs to come apart and be cleaned. If you are worried about it, bring it over to me at my place and we can sort it together. (not oo far to come). You are correct, not knowing what has been done to it in the past, makes the standard rebuild vids and manuals useless and there is a sequence of taking them apart when you have no idea if the check balls are in their standard positions. Also springs can vary and the sep plat may have been drilled or or blocked off at certain points.

    Bushes souldn't be a problem. Get them straight in the bore, use a brass or hardwood drift and tap, making sure they are in line. Just tap and look to see they are going in straight. Once they are a 1/3 in and you have logged how to hit them, drive them home. Its really isn't rocket science.

  3. #23
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,653
    Cheers for that Uncle Fad I might take you up on the offer but at the moment I just want to get it back to as near one piece as I can, the valve body could be one of the last bits to be done.

    The reason I was hesitant on doing the bushes is because the first one I looked at was a big one, (as in long, the tailshaft bush) it was a bugger to remove and was a tight fit for installing and that is when I thought I would be better off getting someone else with the right gear to do it for me, but after Uncle Fads words I thought bugger it, they are just more delicate outer bearings of a sort so I went for it. There are 7 bushes to replace and apart from the tailshaft bush they all went in according to plan, the tailshaft bush was ok but I did need to file a slight burr off before the prop yolk would slip in ok. So all in all not too bad an effort.

    However, the rebuild will now have to wait as I assumed (WRONGLY) that a full rebuild kit would include everything that could wear out but no it doesn't and so I will have to locate some, what look to me like, large thrust washers and a spacer ring. The latter can be either plastic or metal and as my one came out in bits I would assume it was the plastic one

    While I am at it I may as well get new fibro washers as well as they too are not included

    This will give me a bit of time to clean the outer casing and maybe get it coated who knows.

  4. #24
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Bucks
    Posts
    3,048
    Call Vanmatics in Hayes. Tell them G sent you from STA. Mark will sort you out or I will sort him. You can tell him that from me... Ha Ha Ha,

    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...gUMZYu3a2xYooi

    G

  5. #25
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,653
    Cheers Uncle fad, think they are still on their hols as no answer so will try again next week.

  6. #26
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Bucks
    Posts
    3,048
    Do you know the stall speed (approx) of your converter, because they can stall them for you if its to low.

  7. #27
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,653
    I can't find the article that I saw that stated the Jensen had a stall speed of around 1800. The rest of the specification was:

    Total weight 3600lbs
    BHP 325 @ 4600 rpm
    Torque 425lb/ft @ 2800 rpm

    The figures are Gross by all accounts but whatever it propelled the Jensen from 0-60 in 6.5 seconds.

    I was looking at getting a new converter from the states as there is one that has a stall speed of between 2000 - 2400 delivered including duties for just over £200
    This is what they say:
    This Performance torque converter works great in performance street / strip modified small and big block engines with a stall speed of approximately 2000 to 2400 RPM depending on application. Converter is approx. 12" in diameter with a 10" flexplate bolt pattern.

    Welded not Furnace Brazed. Contrary to popular belief, furnace brazing is not the best way to adhere torque converter components to together. Just like a Teflon coated pan, after some time the furnace brazing will erode away and ruin the stators and all other rotating parts in your transmission.

    Industrial Bearings - No Light Duty Needle Bearings. Needle bearings are good, but not great. Industrial bearings give these converters the ability to handle not hundreds, but thousands of pounds of torque. Thatís much better then the higher priced alternative converters.

    Aircraft Aluminum Washers - NO FIBER. Assault converters utilize an aircraft quality aluminum washer instead of those old fiber washers that other companies use. This allows for more horsepower and torque capabilities.

    NO Automation - ALL HAND BUILT. Assault torque converters are hand built and tested to ensure that you are getting the best converter money can buy. No automated process can ensure that you will get that kind of quality. Made here in the USA.


    As you know the front nose on my original converter is goosed so I was thinking that to change the stall speed and fit a new nose would probably cost more than the one advertised.
    Last edited by stilltrying; 29-12-17 at 09:36 PM.

  8. #28
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Bucks
    Posts
    3,048
    For £200.00 I would take their hand off, but don't forget to price up the delivery and taxes BEFORE you buy it. I had about 500 rpm put on mine to stop it dragging the car forward at rest. Did this for a know UK Hot rod a couple of years ago and the guy was delighted that he no longer got leg cramp holding it at a stop.
    G

  9. #29
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    welwyn
    Posts
    1,653
    Spoke to Mark at Vanmatics today and eventually he found someone that knew these old boxes, it wasn't sounding too hopeful to start with as I need a plastic spacer ring and he couldn't find it in the catalogues he had, but there was someone there that had rebuilt one a while back and eventually they rang back and would you believe it they had one in stock plus a kit of the thrust bearings too. Should be with me on Monday.

    I didn't threaten him with you sorting him out uncle fad, thanks for the information and the price wasn't bad either

  10. #30
    Might as well be part of the furniture.
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Bucks
    Posts
    3,048
    Who did he recommend?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •