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  1. #1
    of the Croydon Teds
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    VSCC New Year's Driving Tests

    Bit out of date now, 'cos it all took place at the end of January, but since I've got the time it's worth posting some photos of this atmospheric occasion.

    It was pretty much business as usual for 2019, with around 50 pre-war cars, most of them of a sporting inclination, zooming around a series of specially laid-out courses to test the speed and agility of the cars and their drivers.

    On top of all the competition entries, the Brooklands paddock hosts a small show for anyone with a pre-war car, which is where we'll begin. The Model A Ford was well represented here, with a trio of various years and body styles.








    '36 Ford pick-up joined the paddock cars this year after being relegated to parking out the way with the post-war cars last year. It all looks perfectly period-correct, though I could be almost certain that no American hot rods ever appeared at Brooklands in period.


    I could excuse the pick-up, though in my own opinion the marshals were too lax in parking this Deuce in the paddock. Ignoring the Q-plate, radial tyres and an unquantifiable fibreglass appearance belie its youth. A very nice rod, no doubt, though not entirely conducive to the period character of the event.
    Last edited by Nigel Incubator-Jones; 14-03-19 at 01:28 PM.

  2. #2
    of the Croydon Teds
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    Miss Forrest's 1912 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Silver Ghost was the oldest, largest and quietest competitor for the second year running. The car was originally ordered from the factory by Rolls-Royce Bombay for trial purposes. With its destination in mind, Rolls-Royce's General Manager Claude Johnson christened her Taj Mahal. Today she is also known by the alias 'Nellie' on account of being big, grey and Indian... The Maharajah of Nabha bought the car late in 1913 and it stayed in his family for over 60 years before passing to the current family, who returned the Ghost to England in the 1990s. During the Sedcond World War, the Indian Air Force commandeered the car, fitted truck wheels and painted her battleship grey. She has since become a popular sight at the Brooklands driving tests and concours events.


    In the three years I've attended the Driving Tests, there has always been a solitary American entrant. Previously, this has been a Model A of some description but this year it was this 1929 Chrysler Series 65.




    Compton preserves the legacy of motorsport and motoring enthusiast David Owen Rees of Carmarthen with the 1934 Wolseley Aerees Special. Owen Rees built a series of specials under the Aerees Motor Company name (not, I don't think, ever a registered company), which he conceived in the 1930s. The Aerees Special was his first build and was constructed after the war as a single-seater around a Wolseley Hornet engine. He converted it to a two-seater, competed in sprints and sold it in 1960.




    Speaking of legacies, Sydney Allard lives on in Rose's 1938 Allard Special, Tailwagger II. It was the second car built by Allard for personal hill-climb campaigns and was fitted with a Ford Flathead V8. Interestingly, it features IFS in the form of the LMB (Leslie Mark Ballamy) divided front axle. Rose's restoration began in 2014 after the car had lain untouched since 1971. The only V8-powered competitor, Rose smoked its tyres with aplomb.


    One of the more radical modifieds was the 1928 Peugeot-J.A.P. Lockhart Special of Miss Mainland. The Peugeot chassis was amalgamated with the 980cc popping and banging J.A.P. V-twin by Frank Lockhart in the 1950s.


    In the Edwardian and Vintage age, a light car was defined as any car under 1500cc except cyclecars. Lunch's 1926 Singer Junior characterised the breed exceptionally nicely.


    Austin Sevens can be made to move with serious celerity when tuned and stripped. Fleming's 1928 trials-prepared Ulster was among the quickest.


    Ulph's 1928/30 Austin Seven Ulster Special seems to have taken inspiration from 1930s Grand Prix cars for its long-nosed, low-slung design.
    Last edited by Nigel Incubator-Jones; 14-03-19 at 02:02 PM.

  3. #3
    of the Croydon Teds
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    As for atmosphere...














  4. #4
    Newbie (well to here at least)
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Raleigh, NC
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    Looks like quite a gathering! Some beautiful specimen here. I wish I was there, to be honest.

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