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Thread: Torsion Bars

  1. #1
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    Torsion Bars

    Looking for somewhere that can test the poundage of the torsion bars I have and possibly make two more bigger ones.

    Basically the T was originally designed for a Rover V8 and BW65 autobox but now it has a Big Block Mopar and 727 autobox so my thinking is that the springing is not going to be correct, also when I had the engine and box mocked up in the chassis it was on it's arse. I did try twisting the bars round in the holders but without too much success, having said that I do have a plan to try that again but still not sure if it will work.

  2. #2
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    Torsion bars are just straight coil springs (if you see what I mean) so a good spring company; Ones that make coil springs, should be able to help. Problem is its guess work a lot of the time and every pair that doesn't work costs money.....

    I found one years ago to make the coils for my T. I may have their contact details somewhere but these days its a struggle to find that sort of stuff. Bear with me.
    G

  3. #3
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    I've used Tested Spring, up here in the Midlands, Hainge Road, Tividale. They've made me several pairs of coil springs and lots of leaf springs, some with reversed eyes, even a batch of repro Model A 'high arch' main rear leaf (to clear a quick change), again with reversed eyes. Never had a problem, always been quick turn around. Not had to get anything done for a while but could be worth a call. When this lockdown is done, I'll be up and down to Borehamwood to visit my Mum on a regular basis, so ferrying bits and delivery/collection wouldn't be a problem.

    Alan.

  4. #4
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    Thanks UncleFad, I wasn't sure who would make them as the ends are splined so didn't think an ordinary spring manufacturer would.

    40Stude, very kind of you, I'm doing a bit more research on what I currently have and will go from there, it could be that I just don't have the knack of putting it all together correctly (I have done my big truck ones but they are very agricultural in comparison.

    Not sure if you come down the A1/M to get to your mum's but if you want a chat and a look around the scrap yard anytime just let me know and I can put the kettle on.

  5. #5
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    Just a thought, as you said you altered the preload without much success, another option, to increase the spring rating without new torsion bars would be reduce the pivot length of the torque arms, for example, if the length of the pivot/torque arms was 8" from the centre of the torsion bar to where the link to the front axle and you reduced the pivot point to 4" you increase the spring strength by 50%, move it in only 2" and you get a 25% increase, I know I am saying this without seeing the suspension set up you have, so, its only really a theory,

  6. #6
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    I understand where you are coming from but I think the cost of remaking the lever arms would out weight the cost of two new torsion bars. Unfortunately there is no room to just redrill the connection to the axle.

    I have done further investigation and it would appear that the torsion bars are from an E type jag, approximately 3/4" in diameter and just over 32" long however the ends are 1" diameter hence my thought of getting thicker bars made up, BUT, I would be amazed if the weight of the big block and the lack of any bodywork over the front end outweighed the original jag with bonnet, so more thought to how to preload them is in order before going larger I think.

  7. #7
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    As another thought, Obviously the the bar fits in into a fixed socket within the chassis any way of making the socket so it can rotate it and lock it in position, if it can be rotated by an adjusting screw rotates you can fit it together then adjust the preload, would that work?? I have seen VWs do something similar

  8. #8
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    That's also the system on my Chevy Suburban.

    That is where I was trying to add more load by letting the suspension "drop" then trying to "twist" the locating block but it just wasn't enough. I will give it a look tomorrow and see if the locating lug can be drilled and a bolt inserted to add more load.

    I still think I might have gone about it the wrong way.

  9. #9
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    Always worth having a look on the vw sites for inspiration for torsion bars

  10. #10
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    I'm diggin my memory about all this but when I did the Nova, I lowered it by turning the torsion bars in their socket by a few splines. It did nothing for spring rate just lowered the car . I had to add coil overs at the back as the RV8 was 40 odd pounds heavier than the type 3.

    If you can picture that a torsion bar is just a straight coil spring by putting more preload on it is rather like adding spacer above a coil spring.....

    I may be taking out of my butt here but that what I recall in messing about with the Nova suspension.

    Gerry

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